Family Tree Gal

Family Tree Gal
Family Tree Gal, Carolyn Calton welcomes YOU!

Motto

In every home, frame a family tree to help strengthen your posterity.

Welcome !

I am committed to acknowledging connections throughout the generations--past, present, and future--and igniting a sense of extraordinary family purpose in individuals in THIS generation. Let me help you discover your "roots" as well as strengthen the "branches" of your family tree. If you have had painful experiences in your family line, then this is the blog for you! In fact, all of us will see that as we strengthen ourselves, we strenthen our entire FAMILY TREE through the power of our positive influence.

Monday, April 26, 2010

52 Weeks to Better Genealogy - Challenge #17: Label Your Photos

Memory Lane Monday


Our weekly genealogy challenge ties in perfectly with Memory Lane Monday.
Here’s your weekly genealogy challenge: Label Your Family Photos

As I pondered this weeks challenge, authored by Amy Coffin of the We Tree Blog, my mind raced back a few years. When my mother passed away in the year 2000, I became acutely aware that I wanted my photos to be easily accessed. Memories of the past, accessed through photos, seem to add stability at such a time as the passing of the loved one.

I had kept some scrapbooks of children’s photos and some of my family photos in albums, but hoards of photos had been developed and quickly put in a box year after year—awaiting a “better time” to organize them into albums. By the time my father passed away in 2001, the photos had been carefully placed in matching photo albums. There was no time for chronological order, but, at least, they all had a “photo home” of their own. Labeling will be a logical next step. I’m glad I at least put them in a more retrievable place, however, because they were a source of comfort, helped us remember the good times, and were thought-provoking which stimulated gratitude in my family and friends when my father passed away.

After filling about 17 albums and running out of storage space, I decided to use the computer to download pictures there, label them and burn them to a disc for backup. My goal now is to select pictures from those stored on my computer and burn a family history CD to be given for Christmas gifts for family members each year. I will have a CD of pictures from October of one year to October of the next year to allow myself time to complete the CDs without pressuring myself too much before the holidays in November and December. It’s like a slideshow with titles and music. The family loves it, and I feel satisfied
that the memories will live on.

Labeling pictures can be a family affair that creates a memory of its own.

I mentioned in this weeks Examiner article that I recall some very precious moments while sitting at the small kitchen table in the quaint Utah apartment of my elderly grandmother. Going through a stack of pictures to label them so that people and places were not mistaken nor forgotten was one of the most special moments of my lifetime. Not only were the details of the pictures recorded, but the twinkle in my grandmother’s eye and the sound of her chuckle were indelibly etched in the memories of my heart. I was especially awestruck when I saw a family home made entirely of railroad ties. This added a new perspective to me when I began to understand more fully some of the conditions that existed in my
grandmother’s life and my father’s life, as well.
So, back to the challenge. At a minimum, we can label photos with first and last names, location (if known) and date or approximate date (if known). Becoming familiar with scanning devices and / or digital computer programs may be something you want to put on your genealogy “To Do” list. Give it some thought and decide what you'll do.
We owe our thanks, once again, to Amy Coffin of the We Tree Blog, for authoring these challenges.

View the entire description of this week’s challenge, by using my Examiner.com, Phoenix Genealogy Examiner link. Click here.


Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post from Amy Coffin. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s
16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”









Friday, April 23, 2010

Carnival of Irish Heritage & Culture, 19th Edition: All in the Family Way

I love my Irish heritage. I also love poetry. When I found out that there was a Small-leaved Shamrock Poetry Party, I thought, “Count me in!”

The poetry party is a celebration of Irish verse in honor of the US National Poetry Month 2010. It is part of the 19th edition of the Carnival of Irish Heritage and Culture. This edition will be published at Small-leaved Shamrock on Poem in Your Pocket Day, Thursday, April 29, 2010.

Since “debt” is a big part of American lives at the present moment, I am submitting this Irish rhyme by Thomas Moore.

All in the Family Way
by Thomas Moore


A New Pastoral Ballad (Sung in the character of "Britannia")
I liked the rhyme in it, so considered it "poetry"

["The Public Debt is owed from ourselves to ourselves and resolves itself into a Family Account" - Sir Robert Peel's Letter]

(Tune -- My banks are all furnish'd with bees)
[whatever that tune is!!!]


My banks are all furnished with rags,
So thick, even Freddy can't thin 'em;
I've torn up my old money-bags,
Having little or nought to put in 'em.
My tradesman are smashing by dozens,
But this is all nothing, they say;
For bankrupts, since Adam, are cousins,
So, it's all in the family way.


My Debt not a penny takes from me,
As sages the matter explain;
Bob owes it to Tom and then Tommy
Just owes it to Bob back again.
Since all have thus taken to owing,
There's nobody left that can pay;
And this is the way to keep going,
All quite in the family way.


My senators vote away millions,
To put in Prosperity's budget;
And though it were billions or trillions,
The generous rogues wouldn't grudge it.
'Tis all but a family hop,
'Twas Pitt began dancing the hay;
Hands round! -- why the deuce should we stop?
'Tis all in the family way.


My labourers used to eat mutton,
As any great man of the State does;
And now the poor devils are put on
Small rations of tea and potatoes.
But cheer up John, Sawney and Paddy,
The King is your father, they say;
So ev'n if you starve for your Daddy,
'Tis all in the family way.


My rich manufacturers tumble,
My poor ones have nothing to chew;
And, even if themselves do not grumble,
Their stomachs undoubtedly do.
But coolly to fast en famille,
Is as good for the soul as to pray;
And famine itself is genteel,
When one starves in a family way.


I have found out a secret for Freddy,
A secret for next Budget day;
Though, perhaps he may know it already,
As he, too, 's a sage in his way.
When next for the Treasury scene
he Announces "the Devil to pay",
Let him write on the bills, "Nota bene,
'Tis all in the family way."



I hope you've enjoyed this rhyme.
Have a great day!

Family Tree Gal, Carolyn

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
nota bene- "mark well, observe particularly," c.1721, from L. nota, second person sing. imper. of notare "to mark" + bene "well" (see bene-). nota bene. (n.d.).
Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved April 09, 2010, from Dictionary.com website:
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/nota%20bene

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation from Small-leaved Shamrock or Carnival of Irish Heritage and Culture for writing this post. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Tuesday, April 20, 2010

52 Weeks to Better Genealogy - Challenge #16

Here’s your weekly genealogy challenge: University online library catalogs

View the entire description of this week’s challenge, by using my Examiner.com, Phoenix Genealogy Examiner link. Click here.

Amy Coffin of the We Tree blog has put together the helpful 52 Weeks to Better Genealogy series. These prompts are hosted on the GeneaBloggers website. You may be interested in seeing posts about the challenge from other Genea-Bloggers. Both sites have been voted among Family Tree Magazine’s Top 40 Genealogy Websites this year.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I am listed on the Genea Bloggers Blog Roll because I find it to be a valuable, shared community resource. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Sunday, April 11, 2010

52 Weeks to Better Genealogy – Challenge #15

Here’s your weekly reminder: WRITE A LETTER

View the entire description of this week’s challenge, by using my Examiner.com, Phoenix Genealogy Examiner link. Click here.

Amy Coffin of the We Tree blog has put together the helpful 52 Weeks to Better Genealogy series. These prompts are hosted on the Geneabloggers website. You may be interested in seeing the posts there about the challenge from other Genea-Bloggers. Both sites have been voted among Family Tree Magazine’s Top 40 Genealogy Websites this year.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I am listed on the Genea Bloggers Blog Roll because I find it to be a valuable, shared community resource. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Monday, April 5, 2010

Challenge #14 - 52 Weeks to Better Genealogy

Here’s your weekly reminder: search engines

View this week’s challenge, by using my Examiner.com, Phoenix Genealogy Examiner link.

Amy Coffin of the We Tree blog has put together the helpful 52 Weeks to Better Genealogy series. These prompts are hosted on the GeneaBloggers website. You may be interested in seeing posts about the challenge from other Genea-Bloggers. Both sites have been voted among Family Tree Magazine’s Top 40 Genealogy Websites this year.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I am listed on the Genea Bloggers Blog Roll because I find it to be a valuable, shared community resource. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Thursday, April 1, 2010

THANKFUL, THINK ABOUT IT THURSDAY

Living Into Loneliness: Update

Thinking about the feelings of sadness and melancholy I experienced last Tuesday, I realize that I have already learned a few things.

My neighbor had been taken to the hospital by paramedics, and on that day, I had wondered:
1) Are we prepared for emergencies?, and
2) Are we really “connected” to others in a manner that is meaningful?

One of my concerns last Tuesday had been that I did not have my neighbor’s daughter’s phone number in my planner. Well, I snapped into action and contacted neighbors who then snapped into action themselves. One neighbor had a key to my friend’s home and retrieved the daughter’s phone number from a paper posted on the refrigerator. (My neighbor HAD been prepared for emergencies by posting this info on her fridge.) While this was going on, another neighbor told me of a friend who would have the much-needed phone number. She didn’t have it, but contacted her sister who did.

The first neighbor showed up at my door with the number written on her hand. Meanwhile, the second friend called with the phone number that had been retrieved from her sister. I was delighted that we had the phone number so quickly, yet realize we were fortunate. With other needs, we might not be so blessed to have quick access to vital info or people who could help. I still know that I need to be mindful and proactive in pre-preparing for emergency situations. I’m grateful that we were able to contact her daughter.

Several of us learned who knew where a key to the house was, who had phone numbers and who needed updates. In this way, we all became more prepared. More than one person had had thoughts of updating my friend’s daughter’s phone number, but had not yet acted upon that thought.

Second, I’m deeply moved by the heartwarming “connections” that made themselves manifest through this experience. Everyone who knew my friend moved quickly into action on her behalf. The second source of the phone number is a young woman who took the day off work to go sit in the hospital with our friend. Prayers are being offered in her behalf. I knew she read the Bible each morning, so I offered to bring her a Bible, and I spent a little time listening to her feelings yesterday. She smokes and is going through some withdrawal symptoms while in the hospital—on top of everything else. She’s determined to not find herself in this situation with smoking and withdrawal again, so she asked me to get the remaining cigarettes in her home and throw them in the trash, and I did.

Thinking that my friend was depressed, people put their heads together and offered ideas about having their children visit her more often to cheer her up. They had ideas for pets that might be manageable at her age and give her companionship, etc. The list of ways to “connect” and help went on and on. This very week, I’ve seen that when others find out that someone they love is in need, the compassion they feel still moves them into action—even in this busy world.

Another thing I learned was totally unexpected. I did not expect to receive so many compassionate responses to my postings about my own sadness and melancholy. I was trying to stay focused on my neighbor, yet I was deeply touched and moved by the many responses to the pain of MY sorrow. People I know as well as strangers shared their feelings and hopes. Connections were formed and/or strengthened as compassion and love reached over the miles and settled into my heart to create both gratitude and appreciation for the many people who commented and reinforced the knowledge that we are not alone. Thank you, thank you, thank you to those who took the time to share your feelings and post something or send a comment. I can’t thank you enough.

The goals on my Family Tree Quest website are to:
Glean wisdom from the Past
Live Mindfully in the Present, and
Prepare Confidently for the Future

I’m learning again and again, that we simply do the best we can without beating ourselves up for mistakes or, in my case, for not writing down certain phone numbers. Then we evaluate and learn and set new goals. I’m grateful that so much compassion and love still exists in our world, and that my friend is doing a bit better each day.
* * * * * * *

NOTE: Many of you have asked how she’s doing.

My friend was diagnosed as having dangerously low sodium levels due to a blood pressure medicine’s side effects. This created great fatigue and weakness and perhaps feelings of depression from the imbalance. She was told that such low sodium levels could lead to convulsions or heart attack, so she’s in the cardiac unit.

As of today, she’s still in the hospital until her sodium levels are normalized and her blood pressure is regulated properly with a new medication. She will, most likely, need assistance when she gets home. I hope her daughter will help her get that taken care of.

Another NOTE: I’ve also learned from this experience, how important it is to know what the side effects of our medications might be. Doctor’s are not perfect and sometimes miss things. If we are prepared to ask specific questions regarding medications, that may save us a trip to the hospital. Many people are shocked to hear the implications of low sodium in our bodies and don’t know it could be associated with a medication. I know that I had no idea how serious low sodium could be. This is another good way to Prepare Confidently for the Future.

Link to Tuesday’s post (that I referred to):
http://familytreegal.blogspot.com/2010/03/living-into-loneliness.html